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Atlanta, GA

October 25 @ 8:00 am - October 28 @ 5:00 pm

atlantaga 2 - Atlanta, GA

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Course Overview

Instructor: Chuck McGann
Duration: 5 DAYS
Certification: C|CISO Certified Chief Information Security Officer

The Certified CISO (C|CISO) course has certified leading information security professionals around the world and is the first of its kind training and certification program aimed at producing top-level Information Security Leaders. The CCISO does not focus solely on technical knowledge but on the application of information security management principles from an executive management point of view. The program was developed by seasoned CISOs for current and aspiring CISOs.

C|CISO Material assumes a high-level understanding of technical topics and doesn’t spend much time on strictly technical information, but rather on the application of technical knowledge to an information security executive’s day-to-day work. The C|CISO aims to bridge the gap between the executive management knowledge that CISOs need and the technical knowledge that many aspiring CISOs have. This can be a crucial gap as a practitioner endeavors to move from mid-management to upper, executive management roles. Much of this is traditionally learned as on the job training, but the C|CISO Training Program can be the key to a successful transition to the highest ranks of information security management.

Domain 1: Governance and Risk ManagementDomain 2: Information Security Controls, Compliance, and Audit ManagementDomain 3: Security Program Management & OperationsDomain 4: Information Security Core CompetenciesDomain 5: Strategic Planning, Finance, Procurement, and Vendor Management

1. Define, Implement, Manage, and Maintain an Information Security Governance Program

  • 1.1. Form of Business Organization
  • 1.2. Industry
  • 1.3. Organizational Maturity

2. Information Security Drivers

3. Establishing an information security management structure

  • 3.1. Organizational Structure
  • 3.2. Where does the CISO fit within the organizational structure
  • 3.3. The Executive CISO
  • 3.4. Nonexecutive CISO

4. Laws/Regulations/Standards as drivers of Organizational Policy/Standards/Procedures

5. Managing an enterprise information security compliance program

  • 5.1. Security Policy
  • 5.1.1. Necessity of a Security Policy
  • 5.1.2. Security Policy Challenges
  • 5.2. Policy Content
  • 5.2.1. Types of Policies
  • 5.2.2. Policy Implementation
  • 5.3. Reporting Structure
  • 5.4. Standards and best practices
  • 5.5. Leadership and Ethics
  • 5.6. EC-Council Code of Ethics

6. Introduction to Risk Management

  • 3.1. Organizational Structure
  • 3.2. Where does the CISO fit within the organizational structure
  • 3.3. The Executive CISO
  • 3.4. Nonexecutive CISO

Domain 2: Information Security Controls, Compliance, and Audit Management

1. Information Security Controls

  • 1.1. Identifying the Organization’s Information Security Needs
  • 1.1.1. Identifying the Optimum Information Security Framework
  • 1.1.2. Designing Security Controls
  • 1.1.3. Control Lifecycle Management
  • 1.1.4. Control Classification
  • 1.1.5. Control Selection and Implementation
  • 1.1.6. Control Catalog
  • 1.1.7. Control Maturity
  • 1.1.8. Monitoring Security Controls
  • 1.1.9. Remediating Control Deficiencies
  • 1.1.10. Maintaining Security Controls
  • 1.1.11. Reporting Controls
  • 1.1.12. Information Security Service Catalog


2. Compliance Management

  • 2.1. Acts, Laws, and Statutes
  • 2.1.1. FISMA
  • 2.2. Regulations
  • 2.2.1. GDPR
  • 2.3. Standards
  • 2.3.1. ASD—Information Security Manual
  • 2.3.2. Basel III
  • 2.3.3. FFIEC
  • 2.3.4. ISO 00 Family of Standards
  • 2.3.5. NERC-CIP
  • 2.3.6. PCI DSS
  • 2.3.7. NIST Special Publications
  • 2.3.8. Statement on Standards for Attestation Engagements No. 16 (SSAE 16)


3. Guidelines, Good and Best Practices

  • 3.1. CIS
  • 3.1.1. OWASP


4. Audit Management

  • 4.1. Audit Expectations and Outcomes
  • 4.2. IS Audit Practices
  • 4.2.1. ISO/IEC Audit Guidance
  • 4.2.2. Internal versus External Audits
  • 4.2.3. Partnering with the Audit Organization
  • 4.2.4. Audit Process
  • 4.2.5. General Audit Standards
  • 4.2.6. Compliance-Based Audits
  • 4.2.7. Risk-Based Audits
  • 4.2.8. Managing and Protecting Audit Documentation
  • 4.2.9. Performing an Audit
  • 4.2.10. Evaluating Audit Results and Report
  • 4.2.11. Remediating Audit Findings
  • 4.2.12. Leverage GRC Software to Support Audits


5. Summary

Domain 3: Security Program Management & Operations

1. Program Management

  • 1.1. Defining a Security Charter, Objectives, Requirements, Stakeholders, and Strategies
  • 1.1.1. Security Program Charter
  • 1.1.2. Security Program Objectives
  • 1.1.3. Security Program Requirements
  • 1.1.4. Security Program Stakeholders
  • 1.1.5. Security Program Strategy Development
  • 1.2. Executing an Information Security Program
  • 1.3. Defining and Developing, Managing and Monitoring the Information Security Program
  • 1.3.1. Defining an Information Security Program Budget
  • 1.3.2. Developing an Information Security Program Budget
  • 1.3.3. Managing an Information Security Program Budget
  • 1.3.4. Monitoring an Information Security Program Budget
  • 1.4. Defining and Developing Information Security Program Staffing Requirements
  • 1.5. Managing the People of a Security Program
  • 1.5.1. Resolving Personnel and Teamwork Issues
  • 1.5.2. Managing Training and Certification of Security Team Members
  • 1.5.3. Clearly Defined Career Path
  • 1.5.4. Designing and Implementing a User Awareness Program
  • 1.6. Managing the Architecture and Roadmap of the Security Program
  • 1.6.1. Information Security Program Architecture
  • 1.6.2. Information Security Program Roadmap
  • 1.7. Program Management and Governance
  • 1.7.1. Understanding Project Management Practices
  • 1.7.2. Identifying and Managing Project Stakeholders
  • 1.7.3. Measuring the Effectives of Projects
  • 1.8. Business Continuity Management (BCM) and Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP)
  • 1.9. Data Backup and Recovery
  • 1.10. Backup Strategy
  • 1.11. ISO BCM Standards
  • 1.11.1. Business Continuity Management (BCM)
  • 1.11.2. Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP)
  • 1.12. Continuity of Security Operations
  • 1.12.1. Integrating the Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability (CIA) Model
  • 1.13. BCM Plan Testing
  • 1.14. DRP Testing
  • 1.15. Contingency Planning, Operations, and Testing Programs to Mitigate Risk and Meet Service Level Agreements (SLAs)
  • 1.16. Computer Incident Response
  • 1.16.1. Incident Response Tools
  • 1.16.2. Incident Response Management
  • 1.16.3. Incident Response Communications
  • 1.16.4. Post-Incident Analysis
  • 1.16.5. Testing Incident Response Procedures
  • 1.17. Digital Forensics
  • 1.17.1. Crisis Management
  • 1.17.2. Digital Forensics Life Cycle


2. Operations Management

  • 2.1. Establishing and Operating a Security Operations (SecOps) Capability
  • 2.2. Security Monitoring and Security Information and Event Management (SIEM)
  • 2.3. Event Management
  • 2.4. Incident Response Model
  • 2.4.1. Developing Specific Incident Response Scenarios
  • 2.5. Threat Management
  • 2.6. Threat Intelligence
  • 2.6.1. Information Sharing and Analysis Centers (ISAC)
  • 2.7. Vulnerability Management
  • 2.7.1. Vulnerability Assessments
  • 2.7.2. Vulnerability Management in Practice
  • 2.7.3. Penetration Testing
  • 2.7.4. Security Testing Teams
  • 2.7.5. Remediation
  • 2.8. Threat Hunting


3. Summary

Domain 4: Information Security Core Competencies

1. Access Control

  • 1.1. Authentication, Authorization, and Auditing
  • 1.2. Authentication
  • 1.3. Authorization
  • 1.4. Auditing
  • 1.5. User Access Control Restrictions
  • 1.6. User Access Behavior Management
  • 1.7. Types of Access Control Models
  • 1.8. Designing an Access Control Plan
  • 1.9. Access Administration
2. Physical Security
  • 2.1. Designing, Implementing, and Managing Physical Security Program
  • 2.1.1. Physical Risk Assessment
  • 2.2. Physical Location Considerations
  • 2.3. Obstacles and Prevention
  • 2.4. Secure Facility Design
  • 2.4.1. Security Operations Center
  • 2.4.2. Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility
  • 2.4.3. Digital Forensics Lab
  • 2.4.4. Datacenter
  • 2.5. Preparing for Physical Security Audits


3. Network Security

  • 3.1. Network Security Assessments and Planning
  • 3.2. Network Security Architecture Challenges
  • 3.3. Network Security Design
  • 3.4. Network Standards, Protocols, and Controls
  • 3.4.1. Network Security Standards
  • 3.4.2. Protocols


4. Certified Chief

  • 4.1.1. Network Security Controls
  • 4.2. Wireless (Wi-Fi) Security
  • 4.2.1. Wireless Risks
  • 4.2.2. Wireless Controls
  • 4.3. Voice over IP Security


5. Endpoint Protection

  • 5.1. Endpoint Threats
  • 5.2. Endpoint Vulnerabilities
  • 5.3. End User Security Awareness
  • 5.4. Endpoint Device Hardening
  • 5.5. Endpoint Device Logging
  • 5.6. Mobile Device Security
  • 5.6.1. Mobile Device Risks
  • 5.6.2. Mobile Device Security Controls
  • 5.7. Internet of Things Security (IoT)
  • 5.7.1. Protecting IoT Devices


6. Application Security

  • 6.1. Secure SDLC Model
  • 6.2. Separation of Development, Test, and Production Environments
  • 6.3. Application Security Testing Approaches
  • 6.4. DevSecOps
  • 6.5. Waterfall Methodology and Security
  • 6.6. Agile Methodology and Security
  • 6.7. Other Application Development Approaches
  • 6.8. Application Hardening
  • 6.9. Application Security Technologies
  • 6.10. Version Control and Patch Management
  • 6.11. Database Security
  • 6.12. Database Hardening
  • 6.13. Secure Coding Practices

7. Encryption Technologies

  • 7.1. Encryption and Decryption
  • 7.2. Cryptosystems
  • 7.2.1. Blockchain
  • 7.2.2. Digital Signatures and Certificates
  • 7.2.3. PKI
  • 7.2.4. Key Management
  • 7.3. Hashing
  • 7.4. Encryption Algorithms
  • 7.5. Encryption Strategy Development
  • 7.5.1. Determining Critical Data Location and Type
  • 7.5.2. Deciding What to Encrypt
  • 7.5.3. Determining Encryption Requirements
  • 7.5.4. Selecting, Integrating, and Managing Encryption Technologies

8. Virtualization Security

  • 8.1. Virtualization Overview
  • 8.2. Virtualization Risks
  • 8.3. Virtualization Security Concerns
  • 8.4. Virtualization Security Controls
  • 8.5. Virtualization Security Reference Model


9. Cloud Computing Security

  • 9.1. Overview of Cloud Computing
  • 9.2. Security and Resiliency Cloud Services
  • 9.3. Cloud Security Concerns
  • 9.4. Cloud Security Controls
  • 9.5. Cloud Computing Protection Considerations


10. Transformative Technologies

  • 10.1. Artificial Intelligence
  • 10.2. Augmented Reality
  • 10.3. Autonomous SOC
  • 10.4. Dynamic Deception
  • 10.5. Software-Defined Cybersecurity


11. Summary

Domain 5: Strategic Planning, Finance, Procurement and Vendor Management:

1. Strategic Planning

  • 1.1. Understanding the Organization
  • 1.1.1. Understanding the Business Structure
  • 1.1.2. Determining and Aligning Business and Information Security Goals
  • 1.1.3. Identifying Key Sponsors, Stakeholders, and Influencers
  • 1.1.4. Understanding Organizational Financials
  • 1.2. Creating an Information Security Strategic Plan
  • 1.2.1. Strategic Planning Basics
  • 1.2.2. Alignment to Organizational Strategy and Goals
  • 1.2.3. Defining Tactical Short, Medium, and Long-Term Information Security Goals
  • 1.2.4. Information Security Strategy Communication
  • 1.2.5. Creating a Culture of Security


2. Designing, Developing, and Maintaining an Enterprise Information Security Program

  • 2.1. Ensuring a Sound Program Foundation
  • 2.2. Architectural Views
  • 2.3. Creating Measurements and Metrics
  • 2.4. Balanced Scorecard
  • 2.5. Continuous Monitoring and Reporting Outcomes
  • 2.6. Continuous Improvement
  • 2.7. Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) Continual Service Improvement (CSI)


3. Understanding the Enterprise Architecture (EA)

  • 3.1. EA Types
  • 3.1.1. The Zachman Framework
  • 3.1.2. The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF)
  • 3.1.3. Sherwood Applied Business Security Architecture (SABSA)
  • 3.1.4. Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework (FEAF)


4. Finance

  • 4.1. Understanding Security Program Funding
  • 4.2. Analyzing, Forecasting, and Developing a Security Budget
  • 4.2.1. Resource Requirements
  • 4.2.2. Define Financial Metrics
  • 4.2.3. Technology Refresh
  • 4.2.4. New Project Funding
  • 4.2.5. Contingency Funding
  • 4.3. Managing the information Security Budget
  • 4.3.1. Obtain Financial Resources
  • 4.3.2. Allocate Financial Resources
  • 4.3.3. Monitor and Oversight of Information Security Budget
  • 4.3.4. Report Metrics to Sponsors and Stakeholders
  • 4.3.5. Balancing the Information Security Budget


5. Procurement

  • 5.1. Procurement Program Terms and Concepts
  • 5.1.1. Statement of Objectives (SOO)
  • 5.1.2. Statement of Work (SOW)
  • 5.1.3. Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)
  • 5.1.4. Request for Information (RFI)
  • 5.1.5. Request for Proposal (RFP)
  • 5.1.6. Master Service Agreement (MSA)
  • 5.1.7. Service Level Agreement (SLA)
  • 5.1.8. Terms and Conditions (T&C)
  • 5.2. Understanding the Organization’s Procurement Program
  • 5.2.1. Internal Policies, Processes, and Requirements
  • 5.2.2. External or Regulatory Requirements
  • 5.2.3. Local Versus Global Requirements
  • 5.3. Procurement Risk Management
  • 5.3.1. Standard Contract Language


6. Vendor Management

  • 6.1. Understanding the Organization’s Acquisition Policies and Procedures
  • 6.1.1. Procurement Life cycle
  • 6.2. Applying Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) During the Procurement Process5
  • 6.3. Vendor Management Policies
  • 6.4. Contract Administration Policies
  • 6.4.1. Service and Contract Delivery Metrics
  • 6.4.2. Contract Delivery Reporting
  • 6.4.3. Change Requests
  • 6.4.4. Contract Renewal
  • 6.4.5. Contract Closure
  • 6.5. Delivery Assurance
  • 6.5.1. Validation of Meeting Contractual Requirements
  • 6.5.2. Formal Delivery Audits
  • 6.5.3. Periodic Random Delivery Audits
  • 6.5.4. Third-Party Attestation Services (TPRM)

7. Summary

Chuck McGann

Chuck delivers Cyber Security expertise, insight and support to Federal Agencies & Large Commercial Enterprises under pressure to address increasing cybersecurity threats and challenges, with a current focus on SME leadership and direction for NIST compliance. His functional expertise in compliance includes: SOX compliance strategies, Firewall policy strategies and guidelines, hardening standards, metrics/reporting, Identity/Access Management and CA/PKI operations and support.

SPECIALTIES:

Cybersecurity Strategist, Security Solutions Architect, Risk Management Framework, Incident Response, Information Assurance, CISSP, CISM, IAM, Incident Response Team Creation, Incident Response Operations, Cyber Intrusion Prevention, Cyber Intrusion Detection, Cybersecurity Tools, CISO Management, Endpoint Protection, Security Awareness, PCI, PCI/DSS, Data Loss Prevention, FedRAMP, Security Analytics.

The 5 Domains

EC-Council’s C|CISO Program covers the 5 Domains of executive information security management. The content of each domain was developed by sitting CISOs for current and aspiring CISOs.

Domain 1 covers the importance of Governance, including solid policy writing, aligning the security program to industry-recognized frameworks, and adhering to sometimes contradicting law and regulations.

Domain 2 focuses on Management Controls, Audit Management, and Risk Management, leading students through detailed examples of how to run an audit as well as implement audit findings, choosing the correct management controls for each situation, and the importance of understanding asset value, risk tolerance, and risk treatment plans.

Domain 3 focuses on what makes up the bulk of a CISO’s day – Project Management and the importance of ensuring information security is part of projects from their inception.

Domain 4 is the only CCISO Domain that focuses on technical topics as a high level of technical proficiency is assumed of all CCISO students. Domain 4 stresses the importance of understanding technology and information security core concepts in order to lead teams of technicians and analysts and make decisions around technology issues. Technical issues are addressed from an executive point of view.

Domain 5 consists of content regarding leadership, aligning security programs to the overall goals of the business, strategic management, executive buy-in, financial management and much more. Domain 5’s content sets the CCISO program apart from all other infosec management certifications on the market by teaching the content that technical CISOs are usually lacking.

The Exam

The C|CISO Exam was developed by practicing CISOs and based on the real-world scenarios professionals from across industries have faced while securing some of the most prestigious organizations in the world. The C|CISO Exam is available at Pearson VUE testing centers around the world. Applicant’s knowledge in all five of the C|CISO Domains will be tested on the exam that focuses on scenario-based questions and requires applicants to apply their real-world experience in order to answer successfully. To that end, in order to qualify to sit for the C|CISO Exam after taking the CCISO class, applicants have at least 5 years of information security experience in 3 or more of the CCISO Domains. Any student lacking this experience may take the EC-Council Information Security Management (EISM: https://ciso.eccouncil.orgcciso-certification/eism-program/) exam and earn the EISM certification. In order to sit for the C|CISO exam and earn the certification, candidates must meet the basic C|CISO requirements. Candidates who do not yet meet the C|CISO requirements but are interested in information security management can pursue the EC-Council Information Security Management (EISM) certification.

Details

Start:
October 25 @ 8:00 am
End:
October 28 @ 5:00 pm
Event Category:

Venue

Atlanta, GA
Atlanta, GA United States + Google Map